A Hug From Cambodia

"This is probably the oldest member I've met here in Cambodia. This faithful man has been through a lot. He is 89 years old. and has seen the reign of 4 kings here; several colonization take overs from France to Japan back to France; as well as the Khmer Rouge in the 70s. And now he ride his bike 4 Kilos to get to church every week. Yes, 89-rides a bike, and with the traffic here it really is a miracle that he lives through it."
“This is probably the oldest member (of the LDS Church) I’ve met here in Cambodia. This faithful man has been through a lot. He is 89 years old. and has seen the reign of 4 kings here; several colonization take overs from France to Japan back to France; as well as the Khmer Rouge in the 70s. And now he ride his bike 4 Kilos to get to church every week. Yes, 89-rides a bike, and with the traffic here it really is a miracle that he lives through it.”

I have recently come to know, through church, a young man (teenager), who reminds me so much of my youngest son, who is currently serving a mission in Cambodia. I love to just watch the way this young man interacts with the other youth at church and other activities. He reaches out in kindness, with a spirit of inclusion, and a clear desire to lift those around him. He makes me want to be a better person as I see his good works. I know he has flaws, but I find it refreshing to see someone who clearly works hard to be a light and resist the temptations and weaknesses that may be a part of his life. Watching him is like getting a hug from Cambodia.

It’s easy sometimes to stereotype or judge the youth of today as less willing to do the hard things that are right and build a better world. There are some like that, just as there are some adults like that, but I love that I know so many youth who are motivated to work and overcome difficulties to become the person that God wants them to be. They are an example to me. I want to be like them when I grow up.

(Read and Follow the Directions)

Captain Moroni used such strong language and threatenings against those he imagined might be wicked and refusing to help sustain the country’s armies. Pahoran, the chief judge, could have been offended by his letter. But instead, we see in the next chapter that, rather than take offense, he took hope and was emboldened to have courage, and seek Moroni’s help to recover the governance of the country.
We can choose how we respond to others. We can choose to believe the best about people. Also, I need to learn that it is sometimes better to ask for help early on than to delay and suffer to the point of great risk.

Book of Mormon, more from Alma 60 

36 Behold, I am Moroni, your chief captain. I seek not for power, but to pull it down. I seek not for honor of the world, but for the glory of my God, and the freedom and welfare of my country. And thus I close mine epistle.

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